🎰 Is Radio Ready For A Sports Gambling Network? - Radio Ink

Most Liked Casino Bonuses in the last 7 days πŸ’

Filter:
Sort:
CODE5637
Bonus:
Free Spins
Players:
All
WR:
30 xB
Max cash out:
$ 1000

Listen to Sports Gambling Radio - By BangTheBook free. BangTheBook Radio is the industry leader in presenting sports betting information and analysis.


Enjoy!
Valid for casinos
Visits
Likes
Dislikes
Comments

CODE5637
Bonus:
Free Spins
Players:
All
WR:
30 xB
Max cash out:
$ 1000

Listen to Sports Gambling Radio - By BangTheBook free. BangTheBook Radio is the industry leader in presenting sports betting information and analysis.


Enjoy!
Valid for casinos
Visits
Likes
Dislikes
Comments

CODE5637
Bonus:
Free Spins
Players:
All
WR:
30 xB
Max cash out:
$ 1000

Sports Betting Podcasts Β· VSiN Best Bets Podcast Keep up with all the best sports betting action from the VSiN experts. This podcast has highlights from our shows​.


Enjoy!
Valid for casinos
Visits
Likes
Dislikes
Comments

CODE5637
Bonus:
Free Spins
Players:
All
WR:
30 xB
Max cash out:
$ 1000

Sports Betting Podcasts Β· VSiN Best Bets Podcast Keep up with all the best sports betting action from the VSiN experts. This podcast has highlights from our shows​.


Enjoy!
Valid for casinos
Visits
Likes
Dislikes
Comments

πŸ€‘

Software - MORE
CODE5637
Bonus:
Free Spins
Players:
All
WR:
30 xB
Max cash out:
$ 1000

Listen to Sports Gambling Radio - By BangTheBook free. BangTheBook Radio is the industry leader in presenting sports betting information and analysis.


Enjoy!
Valid for casinos
Visits
Likes
Dislikes
Comments

πŸ€‘

Software - MORE
CODE5637
Bonus:
Free Spins
Players:
All
WR:
30 xB
Max cash out:
$ 1000

How far will radio go to be part of the exploding sports gambling market? Dan Mason and David Gow hope the industry will go very far.


Enjoy!
Valid for casinos
Visits
Likes
Dislikes
Comments

πŸ€‘

Software - MORE
CODE5637
Bonus:
Free Spins
Players:
All
WR:
30 xB
Max cash out:
$ 1000

Also: Freakonomics Radio airs every week on NPR stations across the country; check your local station for the day and time; those episodes are.


Enjoy!
Valid for casinos
Visits
Likes
Dislikes
Comments

πŸ€‘

Software - MORE
CODE5637
Bonus:
Free Spins
Players:
All
WR:
30 xB
Max cash out:
$ 1000

Sports Gambling Radio - By BangTheBook podcast on demand - BangTheBook Radio is the industry leader in presenting sports betting information and.


Enjoy!
Valid for casinos
Visits
Likes
Dislikes
Comments

πŸ€‘

Software - MORE
CODE5637
Bonus:
Free Spins
Players:
All
WR:
30 xB
Max cash out:
$ 1000

Sports Gambling Radio - By BangTheBook podcast on demand - BangTheBook Radio is the industry leader in presenting sports betting information and.


Enjoy!
Valid for casinos
Visits
Likes
Dislikes
Comments

πŸ€‘

Software - MORE
CODE5637
Bonus:
Free Spins
Players:
All
WR:
30 xB
Max cash out:
$ 1000

Sports Gambling Radio - By BangTheBook. Subscribe. Unsubscribe. a day ago.


Enjoy!
Valid for casinos
Visits
Likes
Dislikes
Comments

If Robins had been a contemporary of Peter Gethers, he might have been a candidate for the Rotisserie League. FanDuel actually had a different setup where you could not enter players in later games and then change them during the earlier games. There was one woman, Valerie Salembier, who was a magazine publisher. Fantasy revenues in the U. The Rotisserie baseball league, being based in Manhattan and comprised of Manhattan media elites, quickly gained attention. ROBINS: We have north of 11, south of 12 million registered users that are playing a combination of free and pay games. In my league, we do it by auction. Their ringleader was the magazine editor and writer Dan Okrent. And if you want to go really deep, you can sign up for Stitcher Premium , where you get the entire archive, ad-free, plus occasional bonus episodes. Even though almost everybody in the league was a person whose whole life and job was to observe cultural trends and capitalize on them. Playing fantasy sports helped lessen the sting of not having his own startup. We did it for fun. In , the same year that Peter Gethers and his Manhattan media friends helped give birth to modern fantasy sports, there was an actual physical birth, of a boy named Jason Robins. But his graduation coincided with the bursting of the dot-com bubble. Because the big fantasy-sports companies recently got the gift of a lifetime, courtesy of the U. And at the end of the year, the team with the best statistics wins the pennant. Stephen J. CNN : Breaking news, the Supreme Court this morning, striking down the federal ban on sports betting. Other people were already working on daily fantasy sports β€” most significantly, a company called FanDuel. For more information on the people and ideas in the episode, see the links at the bottom of this post. But most competitions had a really long timetable β€” an entire baseball season or football season, for instance. That is Victor Matheson , a sports economist at Holy Cross. This of course did not mean that people were not betting on sports in those states. Also: Freakonomics Radio airs every week on NPR stations across the country; check your local station for the day and time; those episodes are usually edited a bit differently than the podcasts, just so you know. Is that true? As it grew, it drew scrutiny, including a high-profile corruption charge. Because I was in the original Rotisserie League , so one of the founders of fantasy sports. Supreme Court :. But Robins and his friends thought they could do it better. And if you subscribe to our podcast which of course you should , that stream will be constantly refreshed. When everything went online, everything changed. During college, at Duke, Robins had more than fantasy teams, in various sports. Nobody from that league is still playing. It never occurred to us, and we did it before computers. In , the U. If you want to stream or download the entire Freakonomics Radio archive, which now includes nearly episodes, that too is easy: you can use the free Stitcher podcast app; or you can use this site, where we also publish show notes and transcripts. How much of this explosion has been driven by the fantasy-sports industry? The high-level basis of DraftKings was this: millions of people already loved playing online fantasy sports. And we became partners and we won the first year. Here, the most popular sport is football β€” and the new NFL season is getting underway, just so you know. So when I ask my students what sort of black-market activities are out there? DUBNER: I understand that you may be the longest-running player in fantasy-sports history, the longest-running continuous player. Unfortunately, the media had already run with the story, calling it insider whatever.{/INSERTKEYS}{/PARAGRAPH} You may know him best from the parody version, in Seinfeld. If you have any sort of questions about or trouble accessing our show, write to us at radio freakonomics. ROBINS: We had really been trained at companies and in areas β€” tech analytics and marketing β€” that we thought were core to really building the best mousetrap in daily fantasy sports. And we gamble non-stop for 48 hours. I want to talk about George Costanza. What happens when tens of millions of fantasy-sports players are suddenly able to bet real money on real games? What if you could draft a new fantasy team every day? Their numbers today? For the longer answer, we need to get into the legality of betting on actual sporting events. The short answer: sort of. He was majoring in economics and computer science, with the idea of becoming a tech entrepreneur. Then, no. Steinbrenner was the autocratic owner of the New York Yankees. ROBINS: So, what actually happened was, this employee got sent via secure means some data that included picks on our platform for later games. My dad and mom both also actively played sports. With so many users, there are many different games and tournaments, and there are significant stakes. Lots of meetings. You had to pick all of them up front. So that information could not have even possibly benefited that employee, not to mention the fact that FanDuel actually was making public the overall pick information, which is what he had published because they lock theirs. Below is a transcript of the episode, edited for readability. So they set up meetings with potential investors. Daily fantasy sports β€” how much fun would that be? Robins had two co-workers β€” Paul Liberman and Matt Kalish β€” who were also way into fantasy sports and who also wanted to start their own company. I was just trying every one of them. {PARAGRAPH}{INSERTKEYS}Today, roughly 60 million people in the U. But this was a different era. We sometimes get questions about where, exactly, is the best place to listen to or download Freakonomics Radio. Now, you may be asking yourself: was all this gaming β€” fantasy sports but real money β€” was it legal? DraftKings launched in , with Robins as C. Just how much did it catch on? We invented this thing. There had been plenty of earlier games that replicated baseball and other sports β€” dice games, board games, even games with statistics. And those later games were not on our platform locked yet, but on FanDuel they were. But Gethers says this league was the birth of fantasy sports as we now know it. Four states were grandfathered in β€” Nevada, Oregon, Delaware, and Montana β€” but betting on actual sporting events was explicitly illegal everywhere else. India has million players , with cricket the most popular sport. It truly never occurred to us that a ton of other people would also want to do this. Legalized sports betting β€” on real sporting events β€” is coming to America. My parents were both big sports fans. The whole thing was created to gamble. I mean, none of us came from wealthy backgrounds, and we were using what little money we had saved to fund the business. And how lucrative? So, it was kind of a trumped-up story. Those 60 million people play for fun, they play for pride, and they play for money. But you can also play fantasy baseball, basketball, hockey, soccer, cycling, tennis, golf, e-sports, you name it. Jason Robins disputes this account. L isten and subscribe to our podcast at Apple Podcasts , Stitcher , or elsewhere. The Rotisserie League was named after the restaurant where the founders often ate lunch. So, eventually we figured out a way to time it where we told an investor we were committed to quitting on a certain timeframe, assuming that they put money in, and that worked. This week, for instance, you can hear a conversation with producers Zack Lapinski and Alison Craiglow about the making of the very episode you are about to hear. I cannot have that. But also, the sports industry itself has exploded in the decades since the Rotisserie League began. Fantasy sports, meanwhile, as with many businesses born on the internet, fell into a gray area: unregulated but also not quite illegal. So, instead:. No, here is what happened. We sort out the winners and losers.