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clubs in NSW, of which 40 per cent are located in metropolitan Sydney and example, many problem gamblers incorrectly believe that gaming.


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Psychology Australia - Problem Gambling

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Statistics from studies of gambling in Australia, NSW, and the Central Coast. there are as many as 6, hotels, pubs and clubs providing gaming in Australia. around 15 per cent of these regular players (95 ) are 'problem gamblers'. That means % of the total number of poker machines in Australia are on the.


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Australia's Gambling Crisis - A Current Affair

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clubs in NSW, of which 40 per cent are located in metropolitan Sydney and example, many problem gamblers incorrectly believe that gaming.


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Joey’s Story with Problem Gambling

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registered clubs, to implement certain responsible gambling measures. The first NSW Inquiry into gambling in (IPART, ) highlighted issues such as They defined RG as a policy for the gaming operators to reduce the adverse.


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Problem gambling in Australia

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Statistics from studies of gambling in Australia, NSW, and the Central Coast. there are as many as 6, hotels, pubs and clubs providing gaming in Australia. around 15 per cent of these regular players (95 ) are 'problem gamblers'. That means % of the total number of poker machines in Australia are on the.


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Problem Gambling - Julia

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The challenges of gambling definitions. An Australian definition of gambling problems. The Canadian definition.


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Poker Machines and Gambling

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Gambling is an activity undertaken by many Australians. Over 80% of Australian adults engage Between 1 December to NSW Clubs made a net profit of $1,,, and hotels made a Coast are the biggest players of poker machines in NSW and are the highest risk group for problem gambling.


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Will America Mirror Australia's Gambling Problem? - The Jim Jefferies Show

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Gambling is an activity undertaken by many Australians. Over 80% of Australian adults engage Between 1 December to NSW Clubs made a net profit of $1,,, and hotels made a Coast are the biggest players of poker machines in NSW and are the highest risk group for problem gambling.


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Problem Gambling - Peter

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Statistics from studies of gambling in Australia, NSW, and the Central Coast. there are as many as 6, hotels, pubs and clubs providing gaming in Australia. around 15 per cent of these regular players (95 ) are 'problem gamblers'. That means % of the total number of poker machines in Australia are on the.


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My Gambling Addiction - On The Red Dot - CNA Insider

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determinants of problem gambling in Australia: Assessing the impact of For example, a patron may have ceased using EGMs at a club for a number of years.


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Anti-gambling pledge angers clubs

It's time to leave. She said that when she was distressed she actually approached the staff member herself and she was actually grateful when the staff member said to her "Why don't you go home? So the code of conduct in Victoria is valued by the regulator, the VCGLR, the Victorian Commission for Gambling and Liquor Regulation and it considers the detail of the code of conduct when they're deciding whether to grant licences or increase the licence holding for EGM operators. So we developed a more systematic approach, which I'll explain in the methodology in a moment to look at this questions in a bit more detail. So why are code of conduct given so much weight in regulatory settings? And so on this list they're colour coded to show that purple behaviours are highly probable that a person might have a gambling problem. Another gambler reported that the security guard on the door had recognised that he was self-excluded gambler but had just let him in anyway. We also looked at the regulators annual report last year and found that there were no reported formal warnings issued to venues by the regulator in that year. So five clubs and six hotels and they're varying in scale in terms of the number of machines that they have from 18 machines with a gambler loss of half a million dollars, which is the smallest venue to eighty-eight machines and a loss of We observed the venues for a total of 34 hours and went back multiple times to each venue. Eighty per cent of those reported a primary problem with poker machines and all of the gamblers used poker machines in local clubs or hotels. We interview 40 gamblers, as I mentioned. So it says that staff should approach a gambler displaying signs of a problem, such as gambling every day or finding it difficult to stop gambling, gambling for extended periods, avoiding contact while gambling, making requests to borrow money or displaying aggressive or emotional behaviour while gambling and so that staff in the event that they observe instances should suggest that the gambler take a break from the machine or offer them a refreshment in a quieter part of the venue, so to encourage a break in their gambling. I do not work for any organisation that would benefit from the findings of this study financially and the views are my own and don't reflect the views of the Australian Institute of Family studies or the Australian Government. I'm not going to spend all my money. This slide shows the venues that we observed. However we did hear from some people that they would have found it embarrassing, had staff identified them and tried to have an intervention. This was the only incidence that she could remember where she'd been provided with some support. There's a whole list of problems associated with gambling and codes of conduct are meant to be one measure to help prevent the escalation of gambling problems. In order to reduce the burden on gamblers and on staff there could be legislation that ban practices that don't reflect the spirit of the code of conduct. For instance, the cake and coffee trolley that goes around to the machines in venues could be prohibited or the service of food and drinks to gamblers at machines could be prohibited to encourage a more natural break in use of the machine. So we know that often gamblers experience a lot of stigma because of their problem escalating and they might hide it from their family and friends and so the venue staff are really at the coal face of where this problem is beginning and have a lot - the venue itself has a lot of potential to intervene to prevent problems from escalating. At the moment these are self-regulatory and compliance isn't really monitored much by the regulator. But we also heard from gamblers that they often found that with the ATM removal in Victoria - so this happened several years ago where automatic teller machines were taken out of poker machine venues. I think it was over a decade this gambler had been gambling excessively. So this is an excerpt from one of the hotels in the area from their code of conduct document. But our research shows that venues aren't adhering to these codes. The codes of conduct as they're called in Victoria - I know in other States, such as ACT they're referred to as code of practice but the codes of conduct in Victoria describe passive strategies, such as the display of signage to warn people to, for instance, limit their spending on poker machines. This gambler described how he would go in with a list of all the things that he had to do and to spend his money on and with a note saying, do not spend this money. So we spoke to 40 gamblers and 20 professional. It would provide an additional cost effective way to help gamblers to monitor their use of EGMs. We know that there's the financial distress that's caused by gambling can lead to relationship problems. So the research questions for this study were what does the code of conduct actually say venues will do in the event that a gambler is showing signs of distress and are these protocols actually implemented in practice. This could readily be converted into a universal and binding pre-commitment system that would provide further technological support to gamblers and this would actually help to reduce potentially awkward interactions between gamblers and staff in venues. This was a concentrated sample of the 40 who used local EGMs. We also had reports of breaches in self-exclusion, where one gambler reported calling a venue after she'd lost all her money that she'd been self-excluded from and requesting that staff next time look at her photo and prevent her from coming into the venue. In other cases gamblers said to us they would have like to have had the support but it was never provided. No one's actually evaluated whether a venue implementing its code of conduct as described would actually help gamblers in the long term. We could also limit the multiple cash withdrawals from the ATM. And we don't even know if these interventions would be efficacious. So perhaps penalties should apply to venues that breach their code. So responsible gambling codes of conduct are a requirement of licensing of poker machines in Victoria and they're actually used around the world. In Victoria we now have a voluntary pre-commitment system. So a staff member reported to us his disappointment after having conducted responsible service of gambling training and getting a job in a poker machine venue, when he realised that a gambler in that venue was displaying problematic signs of gambling and he spoke to his manager and said "Should I refuse this next withdrawal of cash? So we didn't include any gamblers that we'd interviewed for the larger study who were using poker machines only at the casino for instance or had only engaged in sports betting. As I mentioned there are 11 of them. So this study was part of a larger project that we undertook here called Gambling in Suburban Australia and this is an incidental finding from that study. Orange possible gambling problems and yellow is an early warning sign. So this is something to consider in the mix of how to deal with this problem. So the professionals included venue support workers in Victoria, who go to venues to train staff in ways to provide responsible service of gambling. We were conducting observations in two local areas of Melbourne, one in the East and one in the West, which was looking at what it is about the local environment that influenced gambling expenditure and we noticed when we were attending poker machine venues in both of these sites that venues weren't implementing their code of conduct. So if you'd like further detail you can have a look at this paper.{/INSERTKEYS}{/PARAGRAPH} Most venues have a protocol that they can provide a paper ticket and the gambler can cash that in at the cashier, rather than take coins or providing food and beverages, so serving gamblers who are using the poker machines. So this person said that they'd be quite negative if a staff member approached them and they'd be a bit upset and embarrassed. And he'd walk out at the end and say, so much for that note and the staff member was just kind of saying, oh, you know, oh well. And we also observed in some venues say a Tuesday morning promotion where the cake and coffee trolley would come around to the machines at the venue at So, really ensuring that people are well served whilst they're at the machine and not really encouraging a break in their use of the machine at all. Responsible gambling is a somewhat contested term, increasingly so, because it places the responsibility for gambling problems often on the individual, rather than exploring what could be done with the operator and also by government through regulation. As well as the observations we also interviewed gamblers. So we looked at the code of conduct documents for each of those venues and in total there were eight individual code of conduct documents because some venues were owned by the same operator or used the same code and we also looked at what the scale of the venue was, so the number of machines and how much was lost by gamblers each year at that venue and whether it was a club or a hotel. However, staff need the legislative support to implement the code of conduct. But aside from the code there's also modifications that could be made to the EGM itself. So I've got some further references here and this is the paper upon which this presentation was made. Before I begin I'd like to just also comment that my colleagues Julie Deblaquiere and Anna Thomas contributed to this study and are co-authors on a paper which this webinar is based upon. We also found that venues often encourage gambling. So for this study as I mentioned it was part of a broader study, Gambling in Suburban Australia, which looked at two local neighbourhoods in Melbourne's East and West and un each of those neighbourhoods there were 11 poker machine venues in total. I am employed by the Australian Gambling Research Centre as Alister just mentioned, which is funded by a Commonwealth Government appropriations. It's not spare. So the problem seem to be that we know that significant harms result from gambling problems. But the regulator would need more resources to monitor compliance. So that's something to consider as well but they're given quite a lot of weight by the regulator. Often it's one or two thousand dollars. Many people described that there should be better regulation around cash withdrawals and I'm sure Laurie and John will speak to this in the next part of this webinar. They also describe protocols for payment of cash to patrons in venue if they are to have a win on an EGM machine and also describe the venue's self-exclusion program. At the moment that's not something that they're set up to monitor. We also spoke to staff at the regulator, venue staff and a venue manager and we coded the transcripts of those interviews using NVivo software and triangulated the findings with what the researchers observed, what the gamblers told us they experienced and what the professionals had also heard from gamblers or from venue operators and we also coded the codes of conduct as well to explore what exactly each venue said that they would do. So the technology is available to develop algorithms to identify problematic or escalating gambling problems and if those were implemented, messages could be sent from the machine to the gambler to let them know that their pattern of use is escalating or to remind them how much money they've spent for instance. And they're important because venue staff are often the first to notice if gambling problems are escalating by gamblers in their venue. At the moment it appears that self-regulation is somewhat ineffective and that legislation requiring venues to adhere to their self-exclusion programs and their code of conduct could help to improve compliance. So this is what one gambler told us. So people could spend whatever their bank allowed them to take out in a day. And we found very limited and only isolated evidence that staff interacted to support or reduce harmful EGM use. We know that it's associated with family violence. On the whole most gamblers reported that they didn't receive any supportive interaction from staff in venues. This is a question that perhaps people might like to write in about but not all gamblers welcome an interaction and staff may not be comfortable navigating that interaction or they might be discouraged by management in intervening with a gambler. But we also found it's not just about staff training. So we found that that was also reported by gamblers themselves, not only was it that we observed it in the 34 hours that we were in these venues. So coming to the results, we observed staff regularly on the floor in the gaming area at the venues but we noticed that they were focused on customer service activities. Red indicates that gambling problems are probable. So not really going beyond that and directing him to some help services or suggesting that he might try to sign up to the self-exclusion program for instance. So coming to some potential solutions. It can lead to all sorts of stress, poor health, suicidal ideation. {PARAGRAPH}{INSERTKEYS}It's a great way to bring our research to life. And he'd describe that to the staff in the venue and said, I've got this list here. We then went to these local neighbourhoods and looked at what was happening in the venues, who was there, what they were doing, whether staff were interacting with patrons in line with their code of conduct descriptions. So they'd offer people refreshments whilst they're sitting at the machine, rather than encouraging them, for instance, as the code of conduct describes to have a coffee in a quieter, different part of the venue, they'd come around and provide Coke or food. Many of the codes are very similar so they seem to be taken from a template. But there's also active strategies, which are the focus of this presentation that discuss how staff should interact with gamblers who are showing signs of distress and how they might interrupt their EGM use if they observe this happening. What are you doing out this late?